advertisement | your ad here Make This Your Home Page

How To Spot An Online Hustler…(Online Daters Beware!)

 

In next month’s issue of Glamour Magazine, Glamour exposes the dangers of dating scammers using online dating sites to scam millions of dollars from women each year.  From men using fake photos to lure women in to last minute “emergencies” and requesting help with cash.  Glamour gives you a few tips to keep in your arsenal just in case you’re feeling suspicious about a budding online romance.

He says he works overseas, blurts “I love you” within weeks, and can never manage to Skype? Those are all clues — and so are these:

The foreign IP address.  There is a number embedded in every email that reveals where the sender’s computer is. (Romancescams.org will tell you how to find it.) A guy who claims to be in Ohio but has a Nigerian IP address is clearly pulling a fast one.

The fake profile photo.  Go to Google and select “Images.”  Click on the camera icon in the right of the search field, and upload your date’s photo.  You’ll see a list of places online where that image appears.  If any are attached to another man’s name, your paramour may be a scammer.

The delayed response.  If a date always pauses at easy questions like “What street did you grow up on? What was it like?” he may be searching the Internet for the right comeback.

The “honey” thing.  These guys almost always use “hon,” love,” or “wifey” rather than your name.  It’s easier when they’re courting so many women — and it’s a way to gain your trust.

If you’re suspicious of any date you meet online… Enter his name and email on sites like romancescams.org, romancescam.com, scamsurvivors.com or military gear.com/asp just to make sure he hasn’t burned other women.  If you do encounter a con artist, post his details on those sites as well, and report him to ic3.gov.  Sometimes it’s that one little bit of information that helps break an investigative case.

Have you ever tried online dating or even meeting someone through social media sites?  Earlier sites like Blackplanet.com or Myspace.com or more had tons of suspicious activity on them.  Luckily I’ve never had to encounter any of those sleezy tactics, however I’ve had a fair share of “hons” “baby” and “wifey” names that I wasn’t too fond about and had to to drop them like a bad habit.

What do you think?  Do you have any tips on how to bust an online scammer?  Share below…

Comments

Leave a Reply

Copyright © 2012 DIVAS ON DESTINATIONS | DIVAS AND DORKS | DIVAS DRIVE IN HEELS

RETURN TO TOP OF PAGE

Your Ad Here